Home Brew Composting Info – Can You Compost Spent Grains

Home Brew Composting Info – Can You Compost Spent Grains

By: Bonnie L. Grant, Certified Urban Agriculturist

Home brewers often treat the leftover spent grains as awaste product. Can you compost spent grains? The good news is yes, but you needto manage the compost carefully to avoid a smelly mess. Home brew compostingcan be done in a bin, pile or even vermicomposter, but you must make sure thenitrogen rich mess is managed with plenty of carbon.

Can You Compost Spent Grains?

Composting home brew waste is just one more way you canpersonally reduce waste and reuse something that is no longer useful for itsprevious purpose. That wet mass of grain is organic and from the land, whichmeans it can be sent back into the soil. You can take something that once wasrubbish and turn it into black gold for the garden.

Your beer is made, and now it’s time to clean up the brewingspace. Well, before you can even sample that batch, the cooked barley, wheat orcombination of grains will need to be disposed of. You can choose to throw itin the garbage or you can utilize it in the garden.

Spent grain composting is being done on a larger scale bybig breweries. In the home garden, it can be used in several ways. You canplace it in a standard compostbin or pile, a wormcomposter, or go the easy way and spread it over empty vegetable beds andthen work it into the soil. This lazy man’s method should be accompanied bysome nice dry leaf litter, shredded newspaper, or other carbon or“dry” source.

Cautions on Composting Home Brew Waste

Those spent grains will release a lot of nitrogen and areconsidered “hot” items for the compost bin. Without plenty ofaeration and a balancing amount of a dry carbon source, wet grains are going tobecome a smelly mess. The breakdown of the grains releases compounds that canget quite stinky, but you can prevent this making sure the composting materialsare well aerated and aerobic.

In the absence of enough oxygen entering the pile, a buildupof noxious odors occurs that will drive away most of your neighbors. Add brown,dry organic items such as wood shavings, leaf litter, shredded paper, or evenripped up toilet tissue rolls. Inoculate new compost piles with some gardensoil to help spread microorganisms to help speed up the composting process.

Other Methods of Spent Grain Composting

Large brewers have gotten quite creative in re-purposing thespent grains. Many turn it into mushroomcompost and grow delicious fungi. While not strictly composting, the graincan be used in other ways, too.

Many growers turn it into dog treats, and some adventuroussorts make various types of nutty breads from the grain.

Home brew composting will return that precious nitrogen backinto your soil, but if it isn’t a process you are comfortable with, you canalso just dig trenches in soil, pour the stuff in, cover with soil, and let theworms take it off your hands.

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Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by Jef » Sun Jun 07, 2020 11:37 pm

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by Northern Brewer » Mon Jun 08, 2020 11:05 am

During lockdown I've been playing around with spent grains in bread as a way to "stretch" flour supplies. Certainly 20% is fine (in fact quite tasty), I'm trying to tweak things to increase the percentages. I dug out the bread machine to try and introduce some consistency and found that if you put spent grains in the fridge then they tend to stay wet, and that can screw up the mixing in the bread machine, whereas earlier batches where I'd left it on the side (because there wasn't room in the fridge) and had dried out more, mixed fine.

There's also recipes kicking around t'interwebs for spent grain flapjacks and pizza dough.

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by TheSumOfAllBeers » Mon Jun 08, 2020 2:03 pm

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by MikeG » Mon Jun 15, 2020 5:32 pm

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by Muscleguy » Thu Jun 18, 2020 9:30 pm

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by Muscleguy » Thu Jun 18, 2020 9:34 pm

[quote=Jef post_id=851213 time=1591569444 user_id=21114]
I’ve a friend waiting on my next brew to use the spent grain as a medium to try and grow mushrooms. Too early to know how that’ll work out, but I like the idea
[/quote]

Well they often use barley straw to grow shrooms on so the grains might work as well. Need something like straw in there as well I would think. But sounds like a good idea to me. Be interesting to see if different grains flavour the shrooms differently. A stout brew vs a weissbier for eg.

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by FUBAR » Fri Jun 19, 2020 12:49 am


I have taken more out of alcohol than alcohol has taken out of me - Winston Churchill

Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by LeeH » Fri Jun 19, 2020 5:22 am

If exclusively fed yes, they should only have an egg cup full a day. Layers pellets contain almost all the nutrition they require, grain does not.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by JamesF » Fri Jun 19, 2020 8:18 pm

My spent grain also goes to our chickens. I just leave a bucket with the spent grain in by the runs and chuck a small panful into each run each morning until it's gone. Then it goes on the compost heap after the chickens have, err, "processed" it. Spent hops go straight to the compost. I have read that it's possible to do a second mash with spent grain and have been meaning to try it for some time, but never got that far.

Plenty of room in our compost bins though:

That's one of three, about 2m square by 1.2m high. The biggest problem is getting enough stuff to compost. I've just had six tonnes delivered by the people who process the council's green waste, to sit there until the veggie plot is cleared at the tail end of the year.

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by Binkie Huckaback » Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:26 am

I've used a number of disposal methods over the years:

1. Burying it on the allotment. This seemed to work fine.
2. Overheard a bloke in a Wetherspoons saying he kept chickens and gave him my number. He didn't get back to me.
3. In the general waste bin. Brew day always seemed to be the day after bin day. Especially if there was a bank holiday on the horizon, resulting in smelly bins and flies.
4. Taking it to the council tip and putting it in the 'non-recyclable' section. Always felt guilty because I wasn't sure if I should be putting it in the garden waste section, but not wanting to ask. Guilt only assuaged by knowing it was not like putting plastic in the garden waste section.
5. Putting it on Freecycle when I lived in North London. No-one wanted it.
6. Gave some to friends to make bread, but they misunderstood and used a whole takeaway container full in a loaf of bread. It turned out like the dwarf bread in Terry Pratchett's Discworld novels. They never asked for more. It's OK if you use about 100ml per loaf of bread but you do have to watch your teeth.
7. Gave it to a fellow allotment holder for his chickens. H e gave me eggs, but also offered me tobacco plants in return, but had to refuse the plants as I'd given up smoking. This made me very sad and left me questioning why I hadn't thought of growing my own when I was smoking.
8. Started putting some of it in our Hot Bin composter into which apparently it is OK even meat scraps. It loves spent grain, trub and spent hops
9. Girlfriend bought some chickens and now gets a bit antsy if I don't brew every couple of weeks as the chickens hassle her if she doesn't have treats for them. We freeze as much as we can.

1. Buy a spade and rent an allotment.
2. Don't talk to strangers in Wetherspoons. It's a waste of time.
3. Schedule your brew day around bin day.
4.Give precisely zero f*cks when taking spent grain to the tip.
5. Give Freecycle a go. I got a fantastic garden shredder last week.
6. Find bread-making friends who listen to what you tell them.
7. Find someone locally who keeps chickens/pigs/goats etc. You might get something in return.
8. Buy a Hot Bin composter
9. Find someone with whom to share your life who keeps chickens/goats/pigs/whatever.

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by TheSumOfAllBeers » Wed Oct 14, 2020 9:46 am

I think composting has always worked well for me, assuming you have setup a compost heap already that is already going along well.

I wouldnt recommend *starting* a compost heap with spend grain, for much the same reason that I wouldnt leave a pile of spent grain in the corner of your garden. But I think if the mass of grain being added to the compost is less than half of the existing mass of compost you should be ok.

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by Binkie Huckaback » Wed Oct 14, 2020 9:27 pm

I wouldnt recommend *starting* a compost heap with spend grain, for much the same reason that I wouldnt leave a pile of spent grain in the corner of your garden. But I think if the mass of grain being added to the compost is less than half of the existing mass of compost you should be ok.

Indeed. Our Hot Bin (brand of compost bin made of very thick polystyrene with a hinged lid) gets well over 40c in the summer and I've never put much in at a time. I'm a bit nervous of leaving it scattered in the garden as being very near some marshland, there are a fair few rats around.

I've yet to get to grips with a 'proper'' compost heap, but as far as I know it's a bit of a dark art and requires a fine balance of various materials. If you want to make compost quickly, I think the 'tumbler' type are pretty good and maybe don't need as good a balance of material.

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by JamesF » Wed Oct 14, 2020 9:58 pm

I'm not sure it's really a dark art, but you do need a reasonable balance of "green" and "brown" material (about 2:1 I believe). I generally think of "green" as leafy stuff and "brown" as tough stalks and woody stuff, but colours can be misleading to follow. Spent coffee grounds are apparently "green" for example.

One problem is perhaps that people tend to have far more green material than brown, lawn clippings being an obvious favourite. I mix them with plain(-ish) cardboard (stripped of packing tape) from "online retailers" that I save for the purpose. Unfortunately they do insist on me actually buying stuff before they'll deliver it. Waste paper seems to work just as well, especially if it is shredded. I just try to stick to things that aren't heavily printed with lots of coloured inks.

Large heaps tend to work better too I think, but relatively few people have the space.

I like the idea of a small enclosed hot compost bin though. I don't like any organic waste leaving the property, but neither am I keen to put cooked food on an open compost heap. I might have to do some research on that.

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by TheSumOfAllBeers » Thu Oct 15, 2020 12:43 am

i did composting specifically to dispose of spent grains and other brewing organic waste to avoid point 3 that @binkie mentions above.

green/brown waste (in composing jargon) balance is an issue and people will mostly have an overabundance of green waste. Ratio is typically 30 brown for 1 green and most people will have loads of green (lawn clippings).

But spent grain is most definitely brown composting material.

Demistifying the jargon: 'green' composting material is nutrient material: protein/nitrogen. 'brown' material is carbon/energy. spent grain has loads of energy left in it (unless your efficiency is huge).

Re: Spent grain disposal - what do you do with it?

Post by orlando » Thu Oct 15, 2020 8:19 am

I am "The Little Red Brooster"

Fermenting: Southwold Again (V3)
Conditioning: Hunter (Tally Ho Clone),
Drinking: Pilgrim, Southwold Again (Adnams Bitter Clone), Happy Birthday, Elusive Butterfly, From Russia With Love (RIS), He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother (Wee Heavy)

Up Next: Agent Orange (English Wheat Beer), Sad Old Red (Flanders Red Ale for barrel ageing project)
Planning: Spring drinking Beer


Growing worms on spent brewery grains

posted 7 years ago

  • So, I currently get and feed a lot of spent brewery grains.
    But I'm interested in turning it into protein.

    So what critter is the best one if your interested in the meat, not the compost?

    And how would I set that up? I suspect pre-composting may be necessary. I'm thinking trenches.

    posted 7 years ago

  • posted 7 years ago

  • You want to use spent grains as critter feed? Is that correct? For turning spent grains into protein for human consumption, there's no need for any precomposting or black soldier flies. First off, you and your animals can eat it straight away. I don't have animals and it tastes bland (also has sharp chaff bits that make it unpleasant unless ground) so I usually just throw my spent grains in the back yard and it's gone in a couple days from the birds flocking over it and squirrels grabbing it up. I was watching a squirrel dig up my recent homebrew grains from the snow just this morning. I can't say from experience but I have heard, and would bet, that chickens, pigs, and cows would be very happy for it. I hope I understood you right, but if not, the worms, flies, and fungus would definitely munch on it too!

    In case you're not familiar with brewing, here's a quick overview. Alcohol is made from sugars, so the brewing process starts by converting starchy grains into sugary grains. For beer it's mostly barley, with additions of wheat, rye, and oats, and possible adjuncts of rice and corn. First the grain is malted, which basically means it's moistened, sprouted, and then dried. It can then be safely stored for long periods until ready for brewing. I know I've read that sprouts are supposed to be more nutritious than raw seed, so I like to think that about malted barley too Anyway, after that the malted grains are crushed and then steeped in hot water. The specific water temperature activates digestive enzymes in the malted grain that convert starch into sugar. When all the water is drained off, it takes most of the sugar with it and that is what goes on to become beer. What's left are your spent grains: fiber, proteins, various minerals, starches that didn't convert, and sugars that didn't drain off.

    Now, in the off-chance that your spent brewery grains have been mixed with other brewery waste, I can't really comment but would caution against consumption. Here's more brew process for ya. After the sugar water is run off, it's boiled with hops, which act as a natural preservative. Then it's cooled and yeast (fungus) is added. The yeast replicate rapidly in the initially aerobic solution, then they start anaerobic respiration (fermentation) of alcohol and co2, which turns the sugary liquid into beer. The waste from THIS part of the process is a small amount of grain particulate that settled out of solution, maybe a few bits of hop, and a whole bunch of dead/dormant yeast cells, as well as trace alcohol, hundreds of various yeasty byproducts, and after exposure to air there's definitely a bit of wild microorganism activity, like lactobacillus or acetobactor. I occasionally dump that waste on my compost, but I don't like to make a habit of it and I definitely don't eat it for several reasons. 1. It's in a highly anaerobic state that would require significant energy on my part to prevent clogging up my nice aerobic compost I work so hard for. 2. It tastes terrible to humans so I have a hard time imagining animals or even worms would feel that differently 3. Yeast is unhealthy as a dominant feature of my gut flora, so it's inadvisable to inundate myself that way. Instead, most of that goes down the drain or spread thin beneath a hedgerow.


    Storing Spent Grain

    Let's face it. Having brew day and baking day on the same day is nuts. If I were going to save my spent grain, I would put it in small sandwich bags and keep it in the freezer. Overnight in the refrigerator might be fine for a few days, but all that water and residual sugar that is left in the grain make it a great growth medium for molds and bacteria.

    You could also dry the grain by using a dehydrator, but baking in the oven probably can be tricky, as even the lowest oven setting can change the chemical composition of the grain. However, you may love that roasted grain flavor, and if you are careful this can be a great way to go about it.


    So you’ve probably brewed and love it, but each time you brew your own beer you are left with a huge bowl of spent grains….

    If you start homebrewing a lot, you can end up with a great deal of the stuff. Many brewers just throw it away but if you want to keep brewing it is nice to know that all that goodness doesn’t need to go to waste. Here are a few useful ways to get more than beer out of your brew day!

    Have a green thumb?

    If you’re a keen gardener then spent grain can make wonderful compost. Spent brewing grain is classed as a nitrogenous waste (fresh = green matter) on the same level as grass clippings. This means that it will do best when layered with some carbonaceous waste (dry = brown matter) such as leaf matter or straw

    One of the easiest ways to use spent grain as compost is to put it straight in the soil. You can dig a small ditch between vegetable rows or in flowerbeds, fill it halfway with spent grain and cover it with dirt. In this way, the microbes already in the garden can easily do their work on the newly arrived nutrients.

    Doggy Lover?

    As long as your spent grains have been kept separate from any hops, they are safe for dog consumption – and combined with peanut butter make great tasting and healthy dog biscuits. Follow this easy recipe to craft some yummy treats for your furry four-legged friend!

    Spent-Grain Dog Biscuits

    Ingredients:

    • 250 grams spent grain
    • 120 grams flour
    • 2 Tbsp. peanut butter
    • 1 egg

    Use your spent grains as soon as possible after brew day. collect the leftover grains and either refrigerate or freeze them to avoid mold.
    Preheat the oven to 200°C.
    Combine the ingredients in a bowl and mix thoroughly.
    Roll out the mixture and use a cookie cutter to form the treats, or shape them by hand.
    Bake for 30 minutes.
    Turn the heat down to 90°C and bake for an additional 3 hours to dry them out.
    Once cool, store them in an airtight container. Makes approx. 30 biscuits

    A Treat for you…

    Our favourite way to use spent grains is to make homemade granola. We find the crunch of the spent grains is light and crispy and lends itself really well to a granola. Why not see for yourself? It is really easy and just as tasty as the really expensive granola you can get in high-end bakeries or food stores.

    The first step is to dry-out your spent grains. Place your spent grains in a large roasting pan and in the oven at the lowest possible temperature until all the moisture is gone, stirring occasionally.
    We like to leave ours in the oven over-night as this is an easy way to have them well dried.

    Home Brewtique Granola Recipe:

    Ingredients:
    • 1/3 cup demerara sugar
    • 70g unsalted butter
    • ½ cup honey
    • 2 cups rolled oats
    • 4 cups spent grain (dried out in oven)
    • 1 tbsp cinnamon
    • 1 cup coconut flour (coconut flakes, or desiccated coconut)

    Optional
    • 200g roughly chopped hazelnuts , almonds and/or pecans
    • 200g dried fruit such as dates, apricots and/or raisins
    • 250g sunflower seeds


    Directions:

    Mix all dry ingredients (except fruit) in a large bowl
    Melt butter and mix together with honey
    Add butter/honey mix to dry ingredients and mix well
    Place in large baking tray in 180 C oven
    Bake for 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
    Add your fruit and bake another 10-20 minutes giving a stir every 5 minutes until your granola is evenly browned.

    Remove from oven and allow to cool.
    Store in an airtight container.

    This granola recipe is especially recommended for use with chocolate grains such as those found in the grain mix for our Milk Stout recipe.

    What did you think? Have any other tweaks to the granola recipe you would recommend, or other uses for your spent grains? Share with your fellow brewers by commenting below. Thanks!


    How to Compost for Homebrewers

    In this video Andy shows us the basics of how to homebrew and walks us through the recipe and process of how to make an American amber ale. Tapping into his years of experience, troche
    he breaks down the seemingly complex process of brewing beer into a series of easy-to-follow steps. Part 2 of 2. More great videos are coming that will help you learn about beer brewing.

    As promised, health system
    here is the recipe from the video:

    American Amber Ale

    Base Grain: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 60L Crystal Malt (milled)

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade Hops (pellets)

    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade Hops (pellets)

    Yeast: 1 packet freeze-dried ale yeast

    The American pale ale is light in color, buy cialis medium bodied, more about
    and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract (two 3.3 pound cans)
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)
    Yeast: Ale Yeast

    Directions:
    Put about two gallons of water in a large kettle and heat the water until boiling. At the same time, purchase
    let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, healing
    I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world (at least in my opinion), the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. In general, beers are classified into to main categories: ales and lagers. Both ales and lagers run the entire course of particular flavors. They both can vary in a wide range of colors, bitterness, aroma, and maltiness. Ales can range from Pale Ale to a Stout. The main difference between lagers and ales (though there are more than a few) lies in the fermentation. Ales are fermented with top fermenting yeast which, as you can imagine, hang around the top of the fermentor. Ales are generally fermented at warmer temperatures for shorter periods and are very simple to make. Lagers, on the other hand, are fermented at cooler temperatures for longer periods of time. The yeast used in fermenting lagers is different as well. Lagers use bottom fermenting yeast, which contrary to its ale relatives, hang out at the bottom of the fermentor. The result of this cooler, longer fermentation and bottom fermenting yeast is generally a crisper, clearer style of lager beer. For all-grain enthusiasts, ales are general made from 2-row malt where lagers are made from 6-row malt. In the modern world, pretty much all beers are fall into either the lager or ale category, or a hybrid of the two.

    Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale. American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet you personal taste or hops availabilty. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt

    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermentor for an additional two weeks.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermentor for a nice strawberry ale! Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    The American pale ale is light in color, this
    medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract (two 3.3 pound cans)
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)
    Yeast: Ale Yeast

    Directions:
    Put about two gallons of water in a large kettle and heat the water until boiling. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, for sale as its name implies, has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, so this is a relatively easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain. The real trick to mastering a homebrew recipe is to start the process by opening up a bottle from your last batch so you can keep cool while slaving over a boiling kettle.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tannins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    This homebrew recipe makes an American brown ale, nurse
    which has more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales, with a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract:
    6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tannins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 1.0 ounce Cascade and 1.0 ounce of Liberty hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 0.5 ounce of Liberty hops for flavoring at the last ten minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Ingredients:

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3-pound cans of amber malt extract. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    This is the easiest homebrew beer recipe ever. Use a can of Munton's Irish Stout, view
    which is prehopped and has everything in it you will need, ampoule add a kilogram (2.2 pounds) of corn sugar, mix in hot water to dissolve everything, and fill up to six gallons with cold water. Add the yeast, and you are done.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, web
    as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Ingredients:

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3-pound cans of amber malt extract. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is probably my favorite homebrew recipe. For this style, viagra
    think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action-packed with hops, there
    and American IPA's even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this homebrew recipe has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces of Centennial hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 1.0 ounce of Cascade hops for flavoring at the last 20 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    An American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract:
    6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, Hemophilia
    0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, esophagitis
    1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, resuscitator
    steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    Directions:
    Steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 1.0 ounce Cascade and 1.0 ounce of Liberty hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 0.5 ounce of Liberty hops for flavoring at the last ten minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    An American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract:
    6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, sildenafil
    0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    Directions:
    Steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 1.0 ounce Cascade and 1.0 ounce of Liberty hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 0.5 ounce of Liberty hops for flavoring at the last ten minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, neurologist
    think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action-packed with hops, health and American IPA's even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces of Centennial hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 1.0 ounce of Cascade hops for flavoring at the last 20 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world (at least in my opinion), the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. In general, beers are classified into to main categories: ales and lagers. Both ales and lagers run the entire course of particular flavors. They both can vary in a wide range of colors, bitterness, aroma, and maltiness. Ales can range from Pale Ale to a Stout. The main difference between lagers and ales (though there are more than a few) lies in the fermentation. Ales are fermented with top fermenting yeast which, as you can imagine, hang around the top of the fermentor. Ales are generally fermented at warmer temperatures for shorter periods and are very simple to make. Lagers, on the other hand, are fermented at cooler temperatures for longer periods of time. The yeast used in fermenting lagers is different as well. Lagers use bottom fermenting yeast, which contrary to its ale relatives, hang out at the bottom of the fermentor. The result of this cooler, longer fermentation and bottom fermenting yeast is generally a crisper, clearer style of lager beer. For all-grain enthusiasts, ales are general made from 2-row malt where lagers are made from 6-row malt. In the modern world, pretty much all beers are fall into either the lager or ale category, or a hybrid of the two.

    Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale. American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet you personal taste or hops availabilty. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt

    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermentor for an additional two weeks.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermentor for a nice strawberry ale! Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    meningitis
    on Flickr”>In general, beer can be classified into two main categories: ales and lagers. Both ales and lagers run the entire course of particular flavors. They both vary in a wide range of colors, bitterness, aroma, and maltiness. The main difference between lagers and ales, though there are more than a few, lies in the fermentation.

    Two big differences are the type of yeast used and the fermenting temperature. Ales are fermented with top fermenting yeast which, as you can imagine from the name, hang around the top of the fermentor. Ales are generally fermented at warmer temperatures (about 65-75 degrees) for short periods and are very simple to make. Lagers, on the other hand, are fermented at cooler temperatures (about 50-55 degrees) for longer periods of time. Lagers use bottom fermenting yeast, which contrary to its ale relatives, hang out at the bottom of the fermentor. The result of this cooler, longer fermentation and bottom fermenting yeast is generally a crisper, clearer appearance many of us associate with lager beer.

    This longer fermentation time plays into the very name "lager." The word comes from germanic roots, meaning "storehouse," referring to a place, often a cool place, where a person might keep food and drink for extended periods. It is thought that lagering may have actually been done by mistake as far back as the Dark Ages, when people would store their beers in cool plaes for later use. These beers happened to have airborne lager yeast float into them, and thus by dumb luck, lagers were invented.

    Other differences exist as well. Beer-Faq has a good breakdown of this in chart form. Ale is an older style of beer than lager. Ales were first made in the days of yore, whenever those were, by brewers who knew that fermentation would happen if they left the tanks open at room temperature. It was only in the second half of the nineteenth century that Louis Pasteur figured out that yeast was responsible for fermentation. After that, people figured out how to culture yeast and make beers and wines with different characteristics. Since then there has been a new set of possibilities available for styles based on yeast differences, rather than other ingredients. People isolated and grew the yeasts that perform well at lower temperatures and used them in their best envornments.

    Another difference is that ales can have stronger, more pronounced, and even aggressive flavors, while lagers are often a bit more subdued. In addition, lagers are normally served at a cooler temperature than their ale counterparts. The proper temperature range for a lager might be in the low 40's, while ales are usually served about ten degrees warmer, in the lower 50's.

    Try doing a taste test between your favorite ales and lagers to see what other differences you note.

    I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, clinic think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action-packed with hops, and American IPA's even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces of Centennial hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 1.0 ounce of Cascade hops for flavoring at the last 20 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    An American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract:
    6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, ask
    0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 1.0 ounce Cascade and 1.0 ounce of Liberty hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 0.5 ounce of Liberty hops for flavoring at the last ten minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Ingredients:

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)

    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    In general, practitioner
    beers are classified into to main categories: ales and lagers. Both ales and lagers run the entire course of particular flavors. They both can vary in a wide range of colors, rx bitterness, aroma, and maltiness. Ales can range from Pale Ale to a Stout. The main difference between lagers and ales (though there are more than a few) lies in the fermentation.

    Two big differences are the type of yeast used and the fermenting temperature. Ales are fermented with top fermenting yeast which, as you can imagine from the name, hang around the top of the fermentor. Ales are generally fermented at warmer temperatures (about 65-75 degrees) for short periods and are very simple to make. Lagers, on the other hand, are fermented at cooler temperatures (about 50-55 degrees) for longer periods of time. Lagers use bottom fermenting yeast, which contrary to its ale relatives, hang out at the bottom of the fermentor. The result of this cooler, longer fermentation and bottom fermenting yeast is generally a crisper, clearer style of lager beer.

    For all-grain enthusiasts, ales are general made from 2-row malt, while lagers are made from 6-row malt. In the modern world, pretty much all beers are fall into either the lager or ale category, or a hybrid of the two.

    In general, web
    beers are classified into to main categories: ales and lagers. Both ales and lagers run the entire course of particular flavors. They both can vary in a wide range of colors, advice bitterness, this
    aroma, and maltiness. Ales can range from Pale Ale to a Stout. The main difference between lagers and ales (though there are more than a few) lies in the fermentation.

    Two big differences are the type of yeast used and the fermenting temperature. Ales are fermented with top fermenting yeast which, as you can imagine from the name, hang around the top of the fermentor. Ales are generally fermented at warmer temperatures (about 65-75 degrees) for short periods and are very simple to make. Lagers, on the other hand, are fermented at cooler temperatures (about 50-55 degrees) for longer periods of time. Lagers use bottom fermenting yeast, which contrary to its ale relatives, hang out at the bottom of the fermentor. The result of this cooler, longer fermentation and bottom fermenting yeast is generally a crisper, clearer style of lager beer.

    For all-grain enthusiasts, ales are general made from 2-row malt, while lagers are made from 6-row malt. In the modern world, pretty much all beers are fall into either the lager or ale category, or a hybrid of the two.

    In general, medications
    beers are classified into to main categories: ales and lagers. Both ales and lagers run the entire course of particular flavors. They both can vary in a wide range of colors, bitterness, aroma, and maltiness. Ales can range from Pale Ale to a Stout. The main difference between lagers and ales (though there are more than a few) lies in the fermentation.

    Two big differences are the type of yeast used and the fermenting temperature. Ales are fermented with top fermenting yeast which, as you can imagine from the name, hang around the top of the fermentor. Ales are generally fermented at warmer temperatures (about 65-75 degrees) for short periods and are very simple to make. Lagers, on the other hand, are fermented at cooler temperatures (about 50-55 degrees) for longer periods of time. Lagers use bottom fermenting yeast, which contrary to its ale relatives, hang out at the bottom of the fermentor. The result of this cooler, longer fermentation and bottom fermenting yeast is generally a crisper, clearer style of lager beer.

    For all-grain enthusiasts, ales are general made from 2-row malt, while lagers are made from 6-row malt. In the modern world, pretty much all beers are fall into either the lager or ale category, or a hybrid of the two.

    In general, prescription
    beer can be classified into two main categories: ales and lagers. Both ales and lagers run the entire course of particular flavors. They both can vary in a wide range of colors, bitterness, aroma, and maltiness. Ales can range from Pale Ale to a Stout. The main difference between lagers and ales (though there are more than a few) lies in the fermentation.

    Two big differences are the type of yeast used and the fermenting temperature. Ales are fermented with top fermenting yeast which, as you can imagine from the name, hang around the top of the fermentor. Ales are generally fermented at warmer temperatures (about 65-75 degrees) for short periods and are very simple to make. Lagers, on the other hand, are fermented at cooler temperatures (about 50-55 degrees) for longer periods of time. Lagers use bottom fermenting yeast, which contrary to its ale relatives, hang out at the bottom of the fermentor. The result of this cooler, longer fermentation and bottom fermenting yeast is generally a crisper, clearer style of lager beer.

    For all-grain enthusiasts, ales are general made from 2-row malt, while lagers are made from 6-row malt. In the modern world, pretty much all beers are fall into either the lager or ale category, or a hybrid of the two.

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, artificial
    I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, ampoule
    at least in my opinion: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, phlebologist
    the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale. American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availabilty. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt

    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermentor for an additional two weeks.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermentor for a nice strawberry ale! Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, medications
    I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, at least in my opinion: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale. American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availabilty. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt

    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermentor for an additional two weeks.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermentor for a nice strawberry ale! Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, capsule
    I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, bronchi
    at least in my opinion: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, Hepatitis
    the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale. American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availabilty. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt

    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract

    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt

    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)

    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)

    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermentor for an additional two weeks.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermentor for a nice strawberry ale! Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, viagra
    I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, find at least in my opinion: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale.

    American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availabilty. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermentor for a nice strawberry ale! Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermentor for an additional two weeks.

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, shop I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, website like this
    at least in my opinion, and a very good jumping-off point for homebrew: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale.

    American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availabilty. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular homebrwe tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermentor for a nice strawberry ale. Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermentor for an additional two weeks.

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, dentist
    I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, case
    at least in my opinion, sickness
    and a very good jumping-off point for homebrew: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale.

    American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availabilty. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular homebrew tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermentor for a nice strawberry ale. Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermentor for an additional two weeks.

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, ambulance
    I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, at least in my opinion, and a very good jumping-off point for homebrew: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale.

    American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availability. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular homebrew tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermenter for a nice strawberry ale. Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermenter for an additional two weeks.

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, more
    I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, allergist
    at least in my opinion, more about
    and a very good jumping-off point for homebrew: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale.

    American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availability. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular homebrew tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermenter for a nice strawberry ale. Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermenter for an additional two weeks.

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, dosage
    I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, more about
    at least in my opinion, order and a very good jumping-off point for homebrew: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale.

    American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availability. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular homebrew tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermenter for a nice strawberry ale. Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermenter for an additional two weeks.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, order
    as its name implies, has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, so this is an easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, pilule
    as its name implies, has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, so this is a realtively easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, drugs
    as its name implies, see
    has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, pharmacy
    so this is a realtively easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, prescription
    as its name implies, cialis has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, so this is a realtively easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, no rx as its name implies, has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, so this is a realtively easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, cheap
    as its name implies, disorder
    has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, cure so this is a relatively easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain. The real trick to making a great homebrew is to start the process by opening up a bottle from your last batch to keep cool while slaving over a boil.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, healing as its name implies, has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, so this is a relatively easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain. The real trick to making a great homebrew is to start the process by opening up a bottle from your last batch to keep cool while slaving over a boiling kettle.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, ambulance
    as its name implies, sick
    has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, so this is a relatively easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain. The real trick to making a great homebrew is to start the process by opening up a bottle from your last batch to keep cool while slaving over a boiling kettle.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, advice
    as its name implies, unhealthy
    has an amber color. It uses malt extract and some specialty grains, more about
    so this is a relatively easy homebrew recipe. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain. The real trick to mastering a homebrew recipe is to start the process by opening up a bottle from your last batch so you can keep cool while slaving over a boiling kettle.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds amber malt extract (two 3.3-pound cans)
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    An American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract:
    6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, psychiatrist
    0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, price
    1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, tooth
    pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 1.0 ounce Cascade and 1.0 ounce of Liberty hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 0.5 ounce of Liberty hops for flavoring at the last ten minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    This homebrew recipe makes an American brown ale, check
    which should have more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract:
    6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, prescription 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 1.0 ounce Cascade and 1.0 ounce of Liberty hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 0.5 ounce of Liberty hops for flavoring at the last ten minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    This homebrew recipe makes an American brown ale, doctor
    which should have more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Ingredients:
    Malt Extract:
    6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, sickness 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, nurse 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Directions:
    Steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt in two gallons of water for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit. When the time is up, pour the liquid through a sieve to remove the grain and hulls. If these are boiled they can leach tanins into the wort, which will produce undesired flavors in your beer. Discard the grain or compost it.

    Bring the wort to a boil. At the same time, let the cans of extract sit in hot tap water so they will be easy to pour.

    Add the warmed syrup to the boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent burning.

    Bring the kettle back to a boil and add 1.0 ounce Cascade and 1.0 ounce of Liberty hops in the wort for 60 minutes.

    Add 0.5 ounce of Liberty hops for flavoring at the last ten minutes.

    Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil.

    Cool the brew pot by placing it in a sink full of ice. Do not add ice directly to the wort.

    Pour the cooled wort into your sanitized fermenter, top up to five gallons, and when it has reached 75 degrees or cooler, pitch the yeast.

    For our first style post of RealHombrew.com, tadalafil I think it would be very appropriate to discuss the America’s biggest contribution to the beer world, ascariasis
    at least in my opinion, and a very good jumping-off point for homebrew: the American Ale. It is safe to say that the majority of beer enthusiasts have enjoyed an ale at one time or another. Despite the commercial popularity of pilsners in America, the craft brew community has brought about a rebirth of the American-style ale.

    American ales are generally a bit more hoppy than their cousins from across the pond and often have a bit higher percent alcohol by volume (ABV). A great deal of the unique hoppiness is due to the floral and citrus characteristics of the hops grown in the United States, especially those developed in California and the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the increased hop characteristics, American ales are generally medium bodied with a lighter malt flavor than than European-style ales. Some of the more notable American ale styles are the American pale, amber, brown, and IPA.

    Let’s get brewing! All the below basic styles are for a five gallon batch using liquid malt extract and hop pellets. Remember, American ales have slightly more hop characteristics than their European counterparts therefore the hops are important in setting the American ale apart. Look for U.S. domestically grown hops for your American ales. Though I use domestic hops as a guide, their use is not by any means a hard rule. Feel free to substitute the hops with other hop varieties with similar Alpha Acid Units (AAU) to meet your personal taste or hops availability. You can use any ale yeast of your choice for fermentation. For the below styles, I recommend fermenting for at least two weeks before bottling or kegging, though fermenting for longer periods is often preferred.

    If you are worried at all about clarity in any of the above styles, try adding 1 teaspoon of Irish Moss to the last 10 minutes of the boil.

    The American Ale styles are easily adaptable to your particular homebrew tastes. The American pale and amber ales can also serve as a great base to develop various seasonal and fruit beers. For instance, try reducing the bittering hops in the American Pale Ale recipe to 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and adding 10 pounds of well washed and chopped strawberries to the fermenter for a nice strawberry ale. Enjoy your personal style of American Ale!

    American Pale Ale. The American pale ale is light in color, medium bodied, and has a distinct hop flavor and aroma.
    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Use two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. Boil 2.0 ounces Cascade hops (2.5 oz for a slightly more bitter flavor) in the wort for 60 minutes. Add an additional 1 oz Cascade hops in the last 5 minutes of the boil. This will give you a classic American Pale Ale style.

    American Amber Ale. The American amber ale flavor is very close to the American pale ale and, as its name implies, has an amber color. The American amber ale has a bit more toasty flavor which can be accomplished by using a darker malt extract and/or adding about a pound of 60L crystal malt as a specialty grain.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1 pound 60L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Cascade (60 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1 ounce Cascade (5 minutes)

    Start with two cans of 3.3 pound amber malt extract. Steep 0.75 to 1.0 pound of milled 60L Crystal malt for 20 minutes between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add to the wort. Boil 2.0 oz Cascade hops for 60 minutes and add 1.0 oz Cascade hops in the last five minutes of the boil.

    American Brown Ale. The American brown ale should have a bit more toasty and nutty notes than the lighter American ales. It should have a brown to dark brown color. The nutty flavor and darker color is achieved by adding specialty grains to the boil. It still keeps to the American Ale style by having higher hop characteristics than a brown ale you would find in England.

    Malt Extract: 6.6 pounds pale malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 0.5 pounds 80L Crystal malt, 0.5 pounds Chocolate malt
    Bittering Hops: 1.0 ounce Cascade, 1.0 ounce Liberty (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 0.5 ounces Liberty (10 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 0.5 ounces Cascade (2 minutes)

    Start with two 3.3 pound cans of pale malt extract. For the specialty grains, steep 0.5 pounds milled 80L Crystal malt and 0.5 pounds milled Chocolate malt for about 20 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add them to the boil. For bittering hops, add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops and 1.0 ounce Liberty hops for 60 minutes. For flavoring hops, add 0.5 ounces of Liberty hops for the last 10 minutes of the boil and finish with 0.5 ounces of Cascade hops in the last two minutes of the boil.

    American Indian Pale Ale. I am a hops lover and the American adaptation of this British classic is one of my favorites. For this style, think back to the American pale and make it hoppier and stronger. IPA’s in general are action packed with hops, American IPAs even more so. They also tend to have a bit higher percent ABV than the other American ale styles and have just a slightly heavier body. A bit of warning, this style has very high hop flavor and aroma!

    Malt Extract: 7.5 pounds light malt extract
    Specialty Grain: 1.0 pound 40L Crystal malt
    Bittering Hops: 2.0 ounces Centennial (60 minutes)
    Flavoring Hops: 1.0 ounces Cascade (20 minutes)
    Finishing Hops: 1.0 ounce (5 minutes)

    For the American IPA, you will want to start with 7 to 7.5 pounds light liquid malt extract. Steep 1.0 pound milled 40L Crystal malt for 15 minutes at 160 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit and add to the boil. For bittering hops add 2.0 ounces Centennial hops. Add 1.0 ounce Cascade hops for flavoring hops in the last 20 minutes of the boil and finish with 1.0 ounce Liberty hops in the last 5 minutes. Indian Pale Ales tend to turn out better with longer fermentation periods. Try fermenting your American IPA for a month or primary ferment for two weeks and then move to a secondary fermenter for an additional two weeks.

    prescription
    on Flickr”>Learning how to compost your homebrew waste is key in being able to harness the life still present in these raw materials. When I first started brewing beer at home I was shocked by the amount of waste that might otherwise go into the trash or down the drain. At the time I was living in an apartment and had no facilities for composting. This was the early 1990s and few people were thinking about how to compost to reduce their footprint anyway, illness
    so it wasn't really on my mind. When I moved into a house with a yard about six years ago, one of the first things I did was build a compotst pile and started making my own rich, dark, beautiful soil for the garden.

    I had been impressed with my old friend Ted's compost for many years, as well as his passion for turning vegetable matter back into rich, black dirt. It was like magic – throw some stuff in a pile and it turns into soil. From whence it came, ere long, it shall return.

    The good news is that if you are brewing, whether it is straight extract or all-grain brewing, you will have compostable byproducts. Pretty much any vegetable matter can be composted, including your spent grain, hops, yeast blanket at the bottom of your fermentation bucket, and even the cotton bag you use for steeping specialty grains.

    Setting up a compost pile is easy. You can literally just pile stuff on the ground and keep adding to the pile. What I did in my yard was to use some odd-sized pieces of wood to make a shallow bin.

    Maintaining the compost is a little more tricky, but certainly not difficult. You have to turn it from time to time. I usually do this every few days, but you can do it daily if you want. This is to aerate the compost so all the little worms and beasties stay happy and do their jobs. You also need to mix in a bunch of different things for your compost to be healthy and vibrant. Add your lawn clippings, pulled weeds, and raked leaves. In general, if you are adding a bunch of stuff with different colors, you are creating a good ecosystem that will make beautiful, rich compost for your garden.

    Now you know how to compost, which begs the question of what to grow. We will have further information on the brewmaster's garden in future posts.


    Watch the video: Spent Brewer Grains